The Alacer Group successfully implements its end-to-end financial crime solution-Velocity, at the Atlantic Community Bankers Bank (ACBB)

Alacer Velocity’s Suspicious Activity Monitoring, Customer Due Diligence & Customer Risk Rating, Cannabis Screening, Case Management, and Automated Reporting, modules now supply end-to-end coverage to secure ACBB and its 350+ associated banks against financial crime.

Pennsylvania, USA — (January 31st, 2022) –  The Alacer Group, a technology-led business transformation organization offering specialized solutions to prevent financial crime has successfully implemented its all-inclusive Financial Crime Solutions Suite, Velocity, at Atlantic Community Bankers Bank (ACBB). The live Alacer-Velocity system now monitors all customer accounts and transactions of ACBB and its client banks.

Financial crime has become a growing worry in the United States over the last 30 years. To address this, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), Bank Secrecy Act, and the Patriot Act impose legislation and policies in the United States to combat financial crime such as money laundering, terrorist financing, bribery, corruption, and more. Financial institutions, particularly banks, are obligated to adopt AML procedures to comply with these rules and regulations. When businesses do not comply, they face loss due to financial fraud and attract heavy penalties and restrictions that could result in the revocation of charters. The Velocity- FinCrime Solutions Suite, with its Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence technology, not only safeguards the ACBB and its associated banks against financial crime but ensures that the banks continue to adhere to the highest compliance regulations imposed by FinCEN, BSA, and the Patriot Act.

Since the stakes were so high, the ACBB, underwent a rigorous selection process. The ACBB team evaluated several small and big names in the financial crime solutions industry and had a eureka moment with Velocity. Checking all their requirements, Alacer-Velocity, a 360o FinCrime Solutions Suite that employs Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence-led investigations, monitoring, and reporting for fast and efficient regulatory compliance, was the solution they had needed. The competition was not over yet, after beating the competition in the selection process, the Velocity team was challenged with an almost impossible deadline. In little to no time, the Velocity team had to inspect the bank’s current system, identify the gaps, clean and segregate their data and finally implement the solution throughout the ACBB. Astonishingly, not only was the Velocity team able to integrate the financial crime suite in time but they were able to do it under budget as well!

Using Alacer-Velocity FinCrime Solutions Suite, the ACBB is now effectively boosting its anti-financial crime operations. Since Velocity is powered by the latest Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning technologies and offers multiple detection methods, it now assists the ACBB, and its 350+ associated banks achieve AML compliance while reducing risks and increasing efficiency. Thanks to the robust architecture of Velocity, along with its multiple detection methods, customized workflows, and advanced analytics, the solution now acts as a powerful shield between ACBB’s system and cybercriminals and a useful weapon to fight against financial crime.

The ACBB has employed various modules of Velocity, including,

  • Velocity TBMS (Transaction and Behaviour Monitoring system) that monitors all customer transactions.
  • Velocity KYCR (Know Your Customer and Risk) for monitoring all existing customers periodic reviews, existing and new customers risk rating, and onboarding new customers.
  • Velocity ICMR (Integrated Case Management and Reporting) supports ACBB by consolidating all alerts and case workflows in one location, supplying a way to quickly develop, investigate, evaluate, approve, and file automated SAR (Suspicious Activity Report) reports.
  • Velocity CSR (Cannabis Screening and Reporting) aids ACBB to decrease false positives by analyzing entities in CRB monitor lists against transaction and customer data.

About ACBB

Founded in 1983, Atlantic Community Bankers Bank (ACBB) delivers correspondent, payments, and lending services exclusively to financial institutions. As a trusted partner, the company aggregates, innovates, and integrates services with over 400 shareholder and client financial institutions. Their solutions drive efficiency, profitability, and relevance among businesses and consumers. ACBB was formed, owned, and is governed by community-focused financial institutions.

About Velocity
The Velocity Financial Crimes (FinCrime) Solution Suite (FSS) helps financial institutions comply with Fraud and Anti-Money Laundering (AML) regulations with ease and simplicity. The solution uses multiple detection methods and an advanced analytics engine powered by Hybrid Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence (AI) to help institutions, large and small, achieve compliance while reducing risk. The Velocity Software Suite includes several data disambiguation tools, such as in-built Entity Resolution, designed to help financial institution get their data right. Core features of Velocity include real-time sanctions screening, fraud monitoring, customer due diligence and risk rating, AML transaction monitoring, cannabis screening, and centralized alert-case-SAR management with real-time dashboards, and automated regulatory reporting and analytics.

Why Satoshi Nakamoto doesn’t matter — Medium

All eyes should be on the emerging technology’s disruption of the banking technology instead of finding the Bitcoin founder

The financial industry is increasingly shadowed by the image of Satoshi Nakamoto; the supposedly reclusive Bitcoin digital currency inventor who has been publicly outed by the press on numerous occasions, only to find once the headlines have ceased that the person in question was not Satoshi Nakamoto. The latest Nakamoto? Australian Craig Wright claimed to be the Bitcoin founder last year, but his claims were largely rebuffed by the Bitcoin community and by the press. Now he is back and begging the world to believe he created Bitcoin, claiming he has ‘extraordinary proof’ to back up his claims.

I say, who cares? The founder of Bitcoin doesn’t matter in the greater scheme of the financial world. What really matters is Bitcoin’s disruption of a technology resistant financial industry, which is taking place on a scale that goes beyond just digital currency.

In fact, 60 Minutes ran a groundbreaking story about fintech’s disruption of the financial arena recently and it pointed out something key to the fintech debate — the banks, by and large, are not mapping to the trends and changes happening in just about every industry that are being caused, not by technology, but by banking customers’ adoption of technology into their everyday lives. One of the fintech startups featured in the story, Stripe, was founded by a couple of millennials from Ireland. Their view of the world is focused on the internet-driven society they were raised in, but is also surprisingly customer focused. . . Click here to read the rest of this story: Why Satoshi Nakamoto doesn’t matter — Medium

Is a money laundering avalanche about to smack Canada? — Medium

If you believe some of today’s headlines, the answer is yes

According to a report issued by Transparency International, Canada is one of the least corrupt countries in the world. And, thanks to its FINTRAC unit, it has long been rumored to be one of the toughest enforcers of money laundering regulations at the government level unit. However, reports are now emerging in its media outlets about new money laundering opportunities and threats in Canada — proof that no country is truly immune to the evils of financial fraud. My take? Since these are just threats and not real cases, I think they may be indicators of Canada’s strength, rather than weakness.

I fear too many North American readers of news stories today only catch the headlines and fail to digest the actual content. They see a headline that says liquor stores, casinos or real estate companies in Canada could fall victim to money laundering schemes, and walk away from the article thinking that the country has somehow lost its tough grip on its regulations. In actuality, nothing could be farther from the truth.

Unlike most government operations, FINTRAC is very proactive. Here are some examples. . . Click here to read the rest of this story: Is a money laundering avalanche about to smack Canada? — Medium

The blockchain train has left the station — Medium

42 major banks have now tested five blockchain technologies

If 2015 was the year everyone was talking about blockchain, this will be the year that everyone builds on it. In the last few months since blockchain hit the cover of the Economist, there have been dozens of announcements trumpeting the benefits of blockchain systems, ranging from proprietary technology developed by Overstock.com and which it plans to use to issue public shares, to open-source technology developed by IBM on the Linux kernel to be freely shared between developers.

To say that the financial services industry is nervous as a result would be an understatement. For decades, banking transactions have been kept on private ledgers that only the institutions could control. Blockchain is changing that system and shaking up the status quo. . . To read the rest of this story, please click here: The blockchain train has left the station — Medium

Israel’s Addition to Financial Action Task Force Long Overdue – Medium

Data proves some existing FATF member countries have much deeper AML issues than Israel

The worldwide Financial Action Task Force (FATF) on money laundering recently announced that Israel will join the organization as an observer starting in June 2016. Considering Israel’s tough stand on terrorists, adding it as an observer is a big step forward for the prestigious FATF, which sets global rules and standards for combating money laundering and terror financing. To date, only 34 countries make up its membership; countries that don’t meet FATF’s standards land on the task force’s blacklist.

In order for Israel to become a full member of FATF, it will have to pass comprehensive international inspection, showing that it has improved identification requirements at its financial institutions and expanded its AML regulations. The rewards for doing this work and joining the organization are that Israel will be able to participate in shaping global policy dealing with financial fraud and position itself as one of the leading countries in the worldwide fight against money laundering and terror financing.

Knowing the other 34 countries already accepted as full FATF members, I’m surprised it took this long to start the membership process for Israel. . . Click here to read the rest of this story on Medium.com.

Pot is legal…but the income isn’t? – Medium

Banking the proceeds remains a crap shoot for legal pot shops

Despite the fact that federal statutes make it illegal, a growing number of states (23 and the District of Columbia at last count) are approving some form of sale of marijuana to the public. These legitimate (by state) businesses have figured out how to securely grow, ship, receive and store their products, but banking the proceeds from these agribusinesses is still a crap shoot.

Banks inherently avoid risk due to the stiff penalties they face for money laundering, an activity largely associated with drugs, so any profits earned from the sale of marijuana are suspicious. As a result, nearly all of the nation’s banks refuse to even offer basic services to these businesses, their owners and employees. This has forced many marijuana-based organizations to move to all-cash transactions — spawning more opportunity for money laundering than if the transactions were handled by the financial services industry.

It’s such a murky area that a bipartisan group of U.S. senators proposed a bill that would legalize banking. . . Click here to read the rest of the story on Medium.com.

Mexico’s Know Your Country Problem – Medium

Mexico develops a U.S. dollar transfer business to thwart money laundering and encourage international commerce

Bloomberg Business broke the news last week that Mexico will soon enter the dollar transfer business in an effort to catch money laundering before it causes harm and to promote the continued exchange of U.S. currency by legitimate Mexican businesses. Mexico’s money laundering woes, followed by subsequent de-risking and this proposed dollar transfer solution, are prime examples of the impact ‘Know Your Country’ can have on a nation’s economy.

Money laundering leads to punishment and de-risking

When it comes to criminal activities, money laundering is a necessary evil. Criminal enterprises in Mexico were finding it a little too easy to launder illicit pesos through U.S. banks. For example, banks were failing to flag transfers linked to Mexican drug cartels, with Wachovia’s gaffe of failing to alert authorities to billions of dollars in wire transfers, travelers checks and cash shipments through Mexico being one of the most egregious. This led to a crackdown by U.S. regulators and law enforcers, causing many banking institutions to back out of working with Mexican businesses entirely as a way to avoid the risk of money laundering and the millions of dollars in penalties associated with it. This process of de-risking, while understandable, does not foster economic growth.

What happens now? Click here to find out on Medium.com. . .

AML Scandals that Flew Under the Radar in ’15 – American Banker’s BankThink Blog

Screen Shot 2016-06-20 at 3.03.02 PMIn addition to anti-money-laundering scandals involving global banks and worldwide organizations such as FIFA that grabbed headlines last year, there were plenty of damaging laundering convictions and accusations in 2015 that went unnoticed but still took a heavy toll on midlevel banks.

Money laundering is a crime that occurs more often than the general public realizes, and in most sectors of our economy. In the past year alone, charity officials, a mortuary owner, a church director and a doctor providing chemo treatments were at the center of appalling cases you probably never heard about.

1. Tayfun Karauzum, of Newport Beach, Calif., was sentenced to five years in prison for distributing $1 million to $2.5 million of Potion 9, which contained a solvent that metabolizes in the body to become gamma-Hydroxybutyrate, or GHB, a known date-rape drug. He then laundered the proceeds.

2. Charles and Diana Muir were sentenced to 48 and six months in prison, respectively, and forced to return the $1.1 million they stole from a 140-year-old college scholarship charity in Louisville, Ky. — the Woodcock Foundation — that was run by Charles Muir. The couple then laundered the proceeds through Diana Muir’s dental business.

To view the rest of the top 10 most unheralded, yet just as disturbing money laundering stories from 2015 please click here.

American banks: all aboard Bitcoin Express? – Medium

U.S. applying anti-money laundering rules to digital currencies

Digitally encrypted cryptocurrencies are hot, particularly as consumer confidence in the current global money infrastructure wanes. So what exactly is a cryptocurrency? The most visible example, Bitcoin bypasses traditional banking systems and operates as an alternative to cash. It’s decentralized, virtual and somewhat anonymous, and was originally developed to handle transactions over the Internet. The currency units consist of a series of numbers that can be traded between accounts, or “wallets,” for services or goods; when it launched in 2009, Bitcoin transactions happened without any government interference (or oversight).

Today, Bitcoin’s not just popular with the average consumer; organized crime and the criminal element have figured out how to use it to efficiently launder money, just as they did with the original cryptocurrency, eGold. In fact, I recently wrote about a money laundering case involving Bitcoin and two secret servicemen who attempted to launder a considerable amount of Bitcoin stolen from Silk Road. For this reason, the U.S. is now applying the anti-money laundering (AML) rules initially written to govern traditional financial organizations to all digital cash companies.

Perhaps even more interesting is that. . . Click here to read the rest of this article on Medium.com.







    What is 2 x 3 ?